Eyas's Blog

Occasional musings on software development, tech, the Middle East, and anything else.

Politics Archives

The Evolution of Bernie Sanders on Race

Usage RightsBernie Sanders by AFGE via FlickrCC BY-2.0

Bernie Sanders flip-flopped too, and that’s okay. People keep mentioning Hillary Clinton’s shifting on issues as a mark against her, but as she explains, this is only evidence that she is a person who responds to new information and develops their opinion, not a block of granite. Sanders, too, has shifted left on race issues and gun control in the past several months. This is a wonderful thing.

I wrote on Medium about the Evolution of Bernie Sanders on Race. Please read the full post there.

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Exploring the non-recursive arguments for Social Justice, pt. 1

Usage RightsI <3 Consent by Charlotte Cooper on FlickrCC BY-2.0

For liberal laypersons, our justification of progressive social policies, as well as our defense for social justice issues in general is often recursive. I discussed this previously, in “I am right, therefore…”—a common pattern of imposing our beliefs on others is often to presuppose that they are right; an unconvincing argument to the other party, but often difficult to detect because the recursive presupposition is often hidden or implicit.

I would like to explore non-recursive arguments for social justice; be it progressive social policies, or ethical arguments of how to deal with others. In academia, of course, the literature is full with sound arguments and in-depth readings into modern questions of social justice. These arguments often to do not make it to the mainstream.

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How to Respond to Fire; Asserting the Self while Avoiding Hypocrisy

Usage Rights"In Remembrance" by Alosh BennettCC BY-2.0

It is difficult to overcome the shock generated by the brutal assassination of Lt. Moath Kasasbeh. Indeed in many ways, I—and many like me—have yet to do so. Throughout the ordeal which was brought some closure by the awful news Tuesday, Jordanians, Arabs, and Muslims alike were of many minds. From anger towards ISIS to self-questioning of the country's role in in the anti-ISIS coalition; from a proportionally cruel response to a calculated power-play, or a pragmatic non-response; from an impulse to double-down on the offense to withdrawing from intervention; we have felt it all, thought it all, and wanted it all.

The need to bring retribution onto those who are too cruel to even respect the last moment of another human is eating at all of us. How could one possibly bring appropriate retribution onto inhumane organizations without descending to proportional inhumanity? How do we resist blood thirsty revenge while still asserting that we—the honorable, peace-loving people of the world—exit, that we have might, that we have true red-lines that cannot be crossed? How does one assert anything when up against a force that it itself uses violence and terror?

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"We Come in Peace" - War, Fear, and How You Can Help

Usage RightsPortion of the Pioneer 10 and 11 Plaque. The man is holding his hand as a gesture of peace..Public Domain (US Government work)

Imagine you are among the first settler colonial humans to discover extraterrestrial life. You have landed somewhere in a distant planet, disembarked, and were going about your daily tasks as you encounter the first signs. Some seemingly sentient, intelligent creature approaches you. It looks different, nothing like you or anyone you've seen, not even like a reptile or sea creature. It approaches.

You might be afraid--you have no means of communicating with this creature. Your first thought is to reassure it: "I come in peace," you could proclaim... not that it would understand.

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More Nuance and Maturity Required in Arguments against NSA Surveillance

Usage RightsNational Security Agency headquarters, Fort Meade, MarylandPublic Domain

Like many, I feel uncomfortable with much of the information revealed about the NSA's surveillance program. The reach and scale of the program are alarming at best, and for many of us, it demonstrates an unjustified attack on the right to privacy. Yet, as I read the arguments leveled against the NSA and other spy agencies for their surveillance programs, I find it hard to identify with or feel represented by any of these arguments: they seem somewhat lacking at best, and likely, fallacious. I am writing this post to demonstrate the flaws with most popular arguments against spying, surveillance, and the NSA. The goal—I hope—is clear: a call for more nuanced arguments that more clearly define why and to what extent is the NSA surveillance program 'wrong'.

The most common arguments against the NSA are variations of the following:

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